Keynote Speakers

A – D    E – H   I – L   M – P   Q – T   U – Z

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A-D

Dr Jeff Ayton

Jeff Ayton

Chief Medical Officer, Australian Antarctic Division
Providing health services in Antarctica

Biography

Dr Jeff Ayton, MBBS, MPH&TM, FACRRM, FACTM, FFEWM, AFFTM, DRANZCOG DA (UK)  commenced with the Australian Antarctic Division as Chief Medical Officer in 2002 with responsibility for the Australian Antarctic Program, medical support and leadership of human biology and medicine research.

He is a past president of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) and the current Chair of ACRRM’s Rural and Remote Digital Innovations Group. He is a current Australian delegate to Scientific Committee of Antarctic Research Life Sciences Scientific Group and SCAR COMNAP Joint Expert Group of Human Biology and Medicine. 

In 1992, Jeff wintered at Casey Station, Antarctica, as a remote generalist medical practitioner. He has subsequently gained varied experience in other rural and remote medical practices as a procedural general practitioner obstetrician/anaesthetist including Lorne, Victoria, Norfolk Island, South Pacific, and Papua New Guinea.

Other roles include global medical assistance and international aeromedical retrievals, Tasmanian after hours general practice and triage, and remote and extreme medicine telehealth practice, standards and innovation.

Abstract

Coming soon..
Fran Baum

Fran Baum

Professor of Public Health, Flinders University
Governing for health and equity: perspective for rural Australia

Biography

Fran Baum is Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor of Public Health and Foundation, Director of the Southgate Institute for Health, Society and Equity at Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. She was named in the Queen’s Birthday 2016 Honours List as an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) for “distinguished service to higher education as an academic and public health researcher, as an advocate for improved access to community health care, and to professional organisations”. From 2009-2014 she held a prestigious Australia Research Council Federation Fellowship. She is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences and of the Australian Health Promotion Association.  She is a past National President and Life Member of the Public Health Association of Australia. She is a member and past Chair of the Global Steering Council of the People’s Health Movement – a global network of health activist (www. phmovement.org).She also served as a Commissioner on the World Health Organisation’s Commission on the Social Determinants of Health from 2005-08.

Fran Baum is one of Australia's leading researchers on the social and economic determinants of health. She holds grants from the National Health & Medical Research Council and the Australia Research Council which are considering a wide range of aspects of health inequities and social determinants of health.  These grants include an NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence on Policies for Health Equity of which she is one of the two co-Directors. Her book, The New Public Health (4th ed. published January 2016 Oxford University Press), is widely cited and used in many public health courses.  Her new book Governing for Health (Oxford University Press, New York, December, 2018) examines how a society can be organised to best promote health.

Abstract

Coming soon..

James Buchan

Adjunct Professor, WHO Collaborating Centre, University of Technology, Sydney
A global view of the rural health workforce

Biography

Professor James Buchan is an Adjunct Professor of the WHO Collaborating Centre at University of Technology Sydney (UTS), Australia; and Senior Visiting Fellow at the Health Foundation in the UK.

He has more than thirty years’ experience working in government, management and as a policy advisor/ consultant, in health care human resources (HRH), having worked in more than 70 countries.

James is specialised in developing strategic intelligence and policy advice at national level and internationally on the HRH implications of health sector reorganisation and healthcare reform; health workforce pay, incentives and reward strategy; workforce planning; employment relations; labour market analysis; and skill mix/ extended roles.

He has extensive experience working with Ministries of Health and equivalent at national level and is an experienced invited speaker at national and international conferences on HR issues in the health sector. He acts as a consultant and adviser for many national and international bodies and organisations such as: World Bank, WHO, OECD and EU. Recent work has been in Australia, China, England, India, Malaysia, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Portugal, Scotland and Sri Lanka. He is currently working on a WHO project on retention of health workers in rural/ remote areas, and as an adviser to the Scottish government National Workforce Planning Group.

Abstract

Coming soon..
Harry Burns

Sir Harry Burns

Professor of Global Public Health, University of Strathclyde, Scotland
Early childhood trauma, social determinants of health, anticipatory care approach

Biography

Sir Harry Burns graduated in medicine from Glasgow University in 1974.  He trained in surgery in Glasgow and was appointed as a Consultant Surgeon in the University Department of Surgery at the Royal Infirmary in Glasgow in 1984.  Working with patients in the east end of Glasgow gave him an insight into the complex inter-relationships between social and economic status and illness.  He completed a Masters Degree in Public Health in 1990 and shortly afterwards was appointed Medical Director of The Royal Infirmary.

In 1994, he became Director of Public Health for Greater Glasgow Health Board, a position he occupied until 2005.  During his time with Greater Glasgow Health Board, he continued research into the problems of social determinants of health and in 2005, he became Chief Medical Officer for Scotland.  In this role, his responsibilities included aspects of public health policy, health protection and, for a time, sport.

He was Knighted in 2011.  In April 2014 he became Professor of Global Public Health at Strathclyde University where he continues his interest in understanding how societies create wellness.  In addition to his University work, Sir Harry is Chair of the Wheatley Foundation, the charitable trust of the Wheatley Group which supports people in the Wheatley community who may be disadvantaged or vulnerable; he is a Board member of Diabetes UK and of Spirit of 2012, the London 2012 legacy charity, a Trustee of the STV Children’s Appeal Board and a Governor of St Aloysius College.

In 2014, the First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, presented him a lifetime achievement award from the Scottish Government and the Scottish Parliament for Public Service.  In September 2016, the Scottish Government announced that he would chair an independent review of targets in Scotland's NHS.  The Report was published in November 2017.

Abstract

Coming soon..
Anne Cahill Lambert

Anne Cahill Lambert

Health Consumer Advocate
“Nothing for us or about us without us” - Better together with rural health consumers

Biography

Anne Cahill Lambert AM is a board member of the Benalla Health in north east Victoria.

Anne’s key health consumer advocacy has been as a Council Member on the NHMRC; as a Council Member of the Australian Organ and Tissue Authority; as Chair of Gift of Life and as someone who has lived through a seemingly terminal illness over a twelve year period.

Anne has a Master of Public Administration, University of Canberra; Bachelor of Health Administration, University of New South Wales; and is a Fellow of the Australasian College of Health Service Management.

She is also a Member in the General Division of the Order of Australia (AM) for service to health care administration, particularly through contributions to improve hospital services for women and children.  She has been the recipient of the ACT Chief Minister’s Special Award for Outstanding Contribution for Organ Donation Awareness; a Life Member of the Australasian College of Health Service Management for conspicuous service to the College; the Inaugural winner of the Women’s Hospitals Australasia Medal of Distinction; and the Children’s Hospitals Australasia Medal of Distinction.

Local listeners in Canberra enjoy Anne’s regular slot on the ABC Radio Sports Panel talking cricket, AFL and AFLW.

Abstract

Coming soon..

Richard Di Natale

Leader of the Australian Greens
Prioritising the needs of rural health into the future

Biography

Dr Richard Di Natale is the leader of the Australian Greens. He was elected to the federal parliament in 2010 and was the Greens’ first Victorian Senator.

Prior to entering parliament, Richard was a GP and public health specialist. He worked in Aboriginal health in the Northern Territory, on HIV prevention in India and in the drug and alcohol sector.

Richard champions evidence-based solutions to the major problems facing our community today: climate change, growing economic inequality and the destruction of our environment.

Richard firmly believes that our democracy should be transparent and work for all of us, not just those who can buy a seat at the table.  He is a leading voice in the campaign to clean up politics by ending corporate influence and donations to political parties.

Richard's achievements in parliament so far include securing almost $5 billion towards Medicare-funded dentistry, winning a campaign to divest $250 million worth of tobacco stocks from the Future Fund, and spearheading campaigns into many issues of public significance including dying with dignity, medicinal cannabis, and drug law reform. His portfolios include health, multiculturalism and sport.

Richard, his wife Lucy and two young sons live off the grid on a farm in the foothills of Victoria's Otway Ranges. The son of Italian migrants, Richard grew up in Melbourne.

Abstract

Coming soon..

E-H

Saul Eslake

Saul Eslake

Economist and Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow, University of Tasmania
Education, employment participation and health outcomes – Tasmania as a case study

Biography

Saul Eslake worked as an economist in the Australian financial markets for more than 25 years, including as Chief Economist at McIntosh Securities (a stockbroking firm) in the late 1980s, Chief Economist (International) at National Mutual Funds Management in the early 1990s, as Chief Economist at the Australia & New Zealand Banking Group (ANZ) from 1995 to 2009, and as Chief Economist (Australia & New Zealand) for Bank of America Merrill Lynch from 2011 until June 2015. In between these last two positions he was Director of the Productivity Growth program at the then newly-established Grattan Institute, a ‘think tank’.

In July 2015 Saul started up his own economics consultancy business, operating out of Hobart, and in April 2016 took up a part-time position as a Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of Tasmania.  Saul is a member of the Australian Parliamentary Budget Office’s Expert Advisory Panel; and is on the Advisory Board of Jamieson Coote Bonds, a Melbourne-based specialist bond investment manager.

He is Chairman of Ten Days on the Island, Tasmania’s bi-ennial state-wide multi-arts festival. He was also a non-executive director of Hydro Tasmania, Tasmania’s state-owned electricity generation business, since 2008.

Saul has a first class honours degree in Economics from the University of Tasmania, and a Graduate Diploma in Applied Finance and Investment from the Securities Institute of Australia. In December 2012 he was awarded an Honorary LLD degree by the University of Tasmania. He has also completed the Senior Executive Program at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Business in New York.

Abstract

Coming soon..

I-L

Kelvin Kong

Kelvin Kong

Conjoint Associate Professor, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle
Hearing loss and poor educational outcomes for rural children

Biography

Kelvin Kong qualified as the first Aboriginal Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS), in 2007, specialising in OtoRhinoLaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery.

Kelvin hails from the Worimi people of Port Stephens, NSW, Australia. He completed a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery at the University of NSW in 1999. He embarked on his internship at St. Vincent's Hospital in Darlinghurst and pursued a surgical career, completing resident medical officer and registrar positions at various Hospitals. Along the way, he has been privileged to serve in urban, rural and remote communities. He has also been humbled to partake in many committee and board roles with Royal Australasian College of Surgery (RACS), Australian Hearing (AH), NHMRC, Australian Indigenous Doctors Association (AIDA), National Centre for Indigenous Excellence (NCIE) and many hospital initiatives.

He is now practising on Awabakal Country in Newcastle. He has a very diverse practice in ear, nose and throat surgery, initiating community clinics, primary health care, outreach and a private practice. His practice offers a full range of services in the discipline of ENT surgery.

Abstract

Coming soon..

M-P

Nicholas Marchesi and Lucas Patchett

Co-founders, Orange Sky
Positively connecting communities

Biography

At the age of 20, best mates Nic Marchesi and Lucas Patchett built a free mobile laundry in their old van to help the homeless. Orange Sky Laundry began in October 2014 and since then, the world first idea has rapidly expanded to 11 vans in Brisbane, Melbourne, SE Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney, Canberra, Hobart, Perth, Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast and Wollongong.

Run by more than 600 volunteers across the country, the custom-fitted vans with two commercial washing machines and two dryers service 73 locations and wash more than 7,000 kgs of laundry every week.

A catalyst for conversation, Orange Sky Laundry facilitates over 1300 hours of volunteering and conversation each week. The organisation has also responded to natural disasters, helping cyclone-affected communities in North Queensland, residents of the Great Ocean Road Bushfires, and more recently, Adelaide flood victims.

Orange Sky Laundry to date has washed over 300,000 kgs of free laundry, but most importantly, fostered over 80,000 hours of positive, genuine and non-judgemental conversation.

In January 2016, Nic and Lucas were honoured as the first ever dual recipient of the Young Australian of the Year Award.

They have also been named Queensland Young Achievers of the Year, and been finalists for the Telstra Business Awards, AIM Leadership Excellence Awards and Brisbane Young Entrepreneur of the Year Awards. They are currently nominated for the Professional Speakers Australia Breakthrough Speaker of the Year Award.

Lucas and Nic present their story of innovation, fast growth, social entrepreneurship, the impact of social media and how simple ideas can have an enormous impact. They speak at schools, corporates and conferences globally, and continue to inspire, motivate and do things differently!

As they continue to expand Orange Sky Laundry Australia-wide, they aim to positively connect the community and improve the lives of others.

Abstract

Coming soon..
McKenzie_Bridget_

Bridget McKenzie

Minister for Regional Services, Sport, Local Government and Decentralisation

Biography

Bridget was born in rural Victoria in the small town of Alexandra. She was raised to be proud and passionate about regional Australia with the traditional rural influences of small business, sport and agriculture.

Bridget has completed a double degree in applied science (specialising in human movement) and teaching (specialising in mathematics). She later went on to conduct research in physical activity with young women in rural settings. During 2009–2010, Bridget was a lecturer for the Faculty of Education at the Monash University.

Bridget’s experiences as a secondary school teacher and university lecturer have fuelled her passion for education and Australia’s young people. She is committed to improving opportunities for young Australians, no matter where they live.

As an agent for change, Bridget is committed to increasing the profile of sport in Australia, promoting women’s sport and equality more broadly. She wants everyone, but particularly women and girls to feel empowered through sport.

As a general sports enthusiast, Bridget is proud to promote healthy, active lifestyles. She continuously encourages her fellow Aussies to get out there and get active and participate no matter their ability or age. She believes that sport and physical activity are powerful mechanisms that connect communities.

As the Minister for Regional Services and someone from a rural town, Bridget understands and recognises the vital importance of access to 21stcentury communications healthcare services and education.

Bridget’s focus is on encouraging the health workforce to the regions so Australians in rural towns have access to a similar level of services as the rest of the country. This will have a positive effect on the overall health of regional Australia including mental health.

Having lived in rural Victoria, Melbourne and overseas, Bridget is firm in her belief that strong regional economies and secure regional communities are critical to the future prosperity of Australia and acknowledges the critical role Local Government plays in ensuring that their communities continue to grow.

Bridget was elected to the Senate of Victoria in 2010 and was re-elected in 2016. She was elected Deputy Leader of The Nationals and appointed Minister for Rural Health, Minister for Sport and Minister for Regional Communications in December 2017, in August 2018 Bridget was named Minister for Regional Services, Sport, Local Government and Decentralisation.

In her role as Senator for Victoria, Bridget has chaired a number of committees including the Senate Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade committee as well as the committee for Joint Senate Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade committee, Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity committee and the Senate Education and Employment Legislation Committee.

As the Deputy Leader of The National Party, Bridget is committed to ensuring that all Australians, regardless of where they live, have access to opportunities that will benefit them and their local communities.

Abstract

Coming soon..
Lorimer Moseley

Lorimer Moseley

Professor of Neuroscience, University of South Australia
Managing pain in rural and remote areas

Biography

Professor Lorimer Moseley is a clinical and research physiotherapist, an NHMRC Principal Research Fellow and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health & Medical Science.  He leads the Pain Revolution Rural Outreach Tour and Local Pain Educator programme.

Lorimer has a special interest in preventing and treating persistent pain and translating pain science discoveries into clinical and education practice. He has published five books and over 300 research articles and is ranked in the top 0.2% of scientists worldwide. He has received prizes from 12 countries including the prestigious American Pain Society prize for public service, the NHMRC’s Marshall & Warren Prize for Innovation and the Clinical Science Prize from the world’s peak body on pain.

Abstract

Coming soon..

Q-T

Bo Remenyi

Bo Remenyi

Paediatric Cardiologist, NT 2018 Australian of the Year
Rheumatic Heart Disease in the NT and how we are succeeding with RHD

Biography

Dr Bo Remenyi is paediatric cardiologist, PhD scholar and a former scientific advisor for the World Heart Federation on rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.  She is the 2018 Australian of the year for the Northern Territory. Dr Remenyi received her medical degree from the University of Queensland and currently works as a paediatric cardiologist at the Royal Darwin Hospital and services many remote indigenous communities. Bo also undertakes humanitarian work with Rotary in resource-poor countries in our region. Both as a clinician and as a researcher, Dr Remenyi’s interests lie in prevention and early detection of rheumatic heart disease.

Abstract

Coming soon..
Peter Sainsbury

Peter Sainsbury

Past President, Public Health Association of Australia and the Climate and Health Alliance
Action before it is too late: climate change and the health of rural Australia

Biography

Peter Sainsbury was until his retirement in 2016 Director of Population Health in South Western Sydney Local Health District. He holds adjunct professorial appointments at the Universities of Notre Dame, Sydney and New South Wales.

His professional interests include health equity and the social determinants of health, environmental sustainability and healthy built environments. Peter is a past president of the Public Health Association of Australia and the Climate and Health Alliance. Other interests include figurative war memorials, cooking and eating, the arts, cricket and Florence Nightingale.

Abstract

Coming soon..
Luis Salvador Carulla

Luis Salvador-Carulla

Head, ANU Centre for Mental Health Research
Using evidence to shape mental health care in rural areas

Biography

Luis Salvador-Carulla is the head of the Centre for Mental Health Research at the Research School of Population Health, Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra (Australia).

He has been advisor to the Government of Catalonia (Spain), the Spanish Ministry of Health, the European Commission (EC) and the World Health Organisation  (WHO). His research has been focused on developing decision support systems in health and social policy, including tools for analysis of technical efficiency and benchmarking, indicators for health policy analysis and priority setting in mental health and in disability. He has coordinated the Integrated Atlas of Mental Health Project for mapping mental health services in over 30 local areas around the World. He received the Leon Eisenberg Award of the Harvard Medical School in 2012 for his contributions in the field of developmental disorders.

Abstract

Current models of mental health care were based on prior knowledge of urban experts. They used performance indicators derived from urban data and were designed for city environments. “Healthcare ecosystems research for evidence-informed policy” is a new framework that underscores the use of contextual information and smart data-driven indicators for developing decision support tools that could be used at local level.

In this context, separate models of urban and rural mental health care are needed both at global and at local level. Although the same premises should be applied in the two environments (universality, one-health, person-centeredness and care integration), the design of a rural care model should take into account a series of specific principles:

1.  Global/local approach: take into account the unique social, cultural, geographic and environmental characteristics of a local area as well as the common problems of care in rural areas around the World;

2.  New technologies, with a particular focus on hybrid reality and eHealth;

3.  Need to develop indicators specifically for rural and remote areas;

4.  Need to design methods to better analyse and understand rural and remote mental health services;

5.  Need to facilitate connection, social cohesion and positive health in rural communities.

In addition value-based models should be complemented with data-driven models based on the actual service provision. A Bayesian-model of rural mental health is currently under development using data of the Integrated Atlases of Mental Health Care including information on service availability, capacity and diversity in selected rural areas in Europe, America and Australia.


Dr Isabelle Skinner

Isabelle Skinner

Chief Executive Officer, International Council of Nurses
Health is not just the absence of disease - how addressing the United Nation's 17 Sustainable Development Goals will lead to healthy people in a healthy world

Biography

Dr Isabelle Skinner, is the Chief Executive Officer for the International Council of Nurses (ICN) which is a federation of 133 national nurses associations representing the more than 20 millions of nurses worldwide. Dr Skinner is a registered nurse and a registered midwife, and is a member of the Australian College of Nurses. She is an experienced leader and innovator in health and higher education with expertise in leading innovation across health systems and high impact research to address complex health and social concerns in the area of rural, remote health and Indigenous health.

Dr Skinner holds a PhD from La Trobe University, a Masters in Public Health and Tropical Medicine from James Cook University, a Graduate Diploma in Professional Communications (multimedia) from the University of Southern Queensland and an Executive MBA from Melbourne Business School. She specialises in digital health and has researched and evaluated telehealth services, designed mHealth (mobile health) and eHealth (electronic health) services.

Recently Dr Skinner has been an academic with progressive leadership roles within the University sector, including Director of Teaching and Learning for Charles Darwin University. She has consulting and board experience, Dr Skinner has run her own research and consultancy business for the last four years, for which she was a finalist in the Telstra Business Woman of the Year for the Northern Territory. Dr Skinner has extensive experience on the Boards of not-for-profit member organisations such as Girl Guides Australia and CRANAplus.  She is a Fellow of CRANAplus, the Australian national health professional organisation for remote health practitioners and is an Aurora Award recipient for her leadership and advocacy for remote health.

Dr Skinner is passionate about improving access to specialist health care services for people in remote and rural communities around the world. She has worked with health care teams and students in Australia, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Singapore, Zimbabwe and China. The health promotion Facebook page she is the Editor for has nearly ½ a million followers in 79 countries.

Abstract

As the largest group of healthcare workers, nurses are an integral part of the solution to improving patient safety and delivering effective and efficient healthcare. Nurses are the link between healthcare service providers, patients, carers, family members and the community. At every level, nurses have a significant role to play whether delivering care, accurately assessing needs, designing the clinical or policy response, or evaluating outcomes and effectiveness.

The Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, were adopted by the United Nations in 2014 to replace the Millennium Development Goals. They contain 17 goals covering a broad range of sustainable development issues for the world, such as ending poverty, hunger, improving health and education, combating climate change, etc. The 191 UN Member States have agreed to achieve these new goals by 2030. 

Health has a central place in SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all ages. But the work of nurses and other health care professionals also has a major impact on the delivery of other SDGs such as education and poverty – these are often referred to as the social determinants of health.

In her presentation, Health is not just the absence of disease: How addressing the 17SDGs will lead to healthy people in a healthy world, Dr Isabelle Skinner, CEO of the International Council of Nurses, will speak about the need to invest in the health workforce and healthcare services in order to get a better economic return with healthier, more productive populations.

Dr Skinner will address the importance of multidisciplinary teams and the need for all public service sectors to work together to ensure the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.


U-Z

James Ward

James Ward

Associate Professor and Head, Aboriginal Health Infectious Diseases
Infectious disease and Aboriginal health in remote communities

Biography

Associate Professor James Ward has over 20 years of experience working within Aboriginal health and communities in Australia. He is a descendent of the Pitjantjatjara and Nurrunga clans of central and southern Australia and, in 2014 was appointed at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute as the Head of Infectious Diseases Research Program - Aboriginal Health.

During the last five years he has progressed research in the areas of sexually transmissible infections (STIs), blood borne viruses (BBVs), vaccine preventable diseases and offender health. James is currently lead investigator for a Centre for Research Excellence in STIs and BBVs, a grant aiming to improve outcomes in Aboriginal communities caused by methamphetamine use and projects to develop and deliver co-ordinated sexual health education programs for Aboriginal communities living in remote and very remote areas to increase opportunistic STI testing in young Indigenous people.

Abstract

Coming soon..
Paul Worley

Paul Worley

National Rural Health Commissioner
Sustainable rural health teams, our future or fantasy

Biography

Emeritus Professor Paul Worley is Australia’s first National Rural Health Commissioner (appointed November 2017).

Paul studied medicine at the University of Adelaide, graduating in 1984. He was in solo rural practice at Lameroo, in the Murray Mallee region of South Australia, and then moved to a group rural practice at Clare, a wine growing area in the mid north of the State.

In 1992 he was elected President of the Rural Doctors Association of South Australia. In 1994 he took up appointment as Senior Lecturer in Rural Health at Flinders University of South Australia.

As well as maintaining an active clinical workload in both rural and urban practice, Paul has been responsible for coordinating the rapid expansion of Flinders University’s rural education programs in undergraduate and postgraduate rural practice.

He is a past Academic Director on the Board of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine, and was the Commonwealth appointed Chair of the Prevocational General Practice Placements Program from 2005 to 2009 and the John Flynn Scholarship Scheme from 2004-2007.

His passion is to encourage Medical Schools to see that their obligation to the communities they serve is integral to their academic leadership responsibility.

In 2001, he was appointed Professor and Director for the Flinders University Rural Clinical School and Editor of Rural and Remote Health, the International Journal of Rural and Remote Health Research, Education, Practice and Policy.  In 2007, he was appointed as Dean of the School of Medicine at Flinders University.  Prior to taking up the position of Rural Health Commissioner he was the Executive Director Medical Services, Country Health SA Local Health Network.

Abstract

Coming soon..